Reviews

Lorna in Dead Accounts by Theresa Rebeck at Hampton Theatre Company

“The five-person cast of this play is pitch perfect. I was completely enamored with HTC newcomer Mary McGloin’s portrayal of Jack’s sister Lorna, a vivacious girl with a sharp mind, a big heart, and a penchant for telling the truth at high volume for everyone to hear. While Ms. McGloin lives in Brooklyn and is appearing courtesy of Actors’ Equity Association, I hope to see her again here.”

JANUARY 16, 2016 BY BETH YOUNG, EAST END BEACON

 

“McGloin is a standout performer as Lorna, punctuating the humor of playwright Theresa Rebeck’s brilliant writing.”

JANUARY 18, 2016 BY BRENDAN J. O’REILLY, DAN’S PAPERS 

“Mary McGloin as Lorna exudes the self-inflicted frustration of a grown daughter living in her childhood home with her parents…”

JANUARY 18, 2016 BY STEVE PARKS, NEWSDAY 

 

“Ms. McGloin gives a strong and heartfelt performance as the sister who has given up her own life to help their mother…”

JANUARY 21, 2016 BY BRIDGET LEROY, THE EAST HAMPTON STAR 

“I’ve never seen Mary McGloin before this show, as I believe this is her first East End role, but I thoroughly enjoyed her as Lorna.”

JANUARY 16, 2016 BY DAWN WATSON, HAMPTONS PARTY GIRL


Susan* in How the World Began** by Catherine Trieschmann at Custom Made Theatre Company

*2015 SF Bay Area Theatre Critics Circle Award Nominee – Principal Actress – Play – In a Theater With Under 100 seats

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“McGloin gives us a powerful and fascinating multi-faceted Susan, strong, sensitive, and surprising at every moment. We cannot take our eyes off her, as she unwraps her own tangled motivations, while trying to make herself at home in the recently and horribly tornado-ravaged little town of Plainview. McGloin takes us with her every step of the way, brilliantly embodying a young woman who has taken her solitary pregnancy to the plains and is also trying to be helpful to the afflicted town. She has the teacher’s idealism and the scientist’s material knowledge to keep her going. But she is walking into a hornet’s nest. We could watch her wrestle with demons all night and never tire because McGloin embodies a Susan we want to know better, at each step. Her worried smile and long red hair alone could steal the show.”

FEBRUARY 19, 2015 BY BARRY DAVID HORWITZ, THEATRESTORM 

“Mary McGloin (Susan)…all deliver strong performances…..In Susan, McGloin brings a tightly-wound nervous energy to her playing…She’s a bit fragile. She can also be self-deprecatingly funny, earnest, occasionally glib and capable of mustering steely resolve or deep compassion as the situation demands.

FEBRUARY 19, 2015 BY ROBERT SOKOL, SF EXAMINER 

“Mary McGloin is outstanding as the well-meaning but inexperienced teacher. She shows a natural empathy for the wounded Micah, as dependable as her prickliness, without turning her into a phobic exaggeration.”

FEBRUARY 17, 2015 BY RICHARD CONNEMA, FOR ALL EVENTS/TALKIN’ BROADWAY

“Ms. McGloin masterfully balances being stubborn in her and the science curriculum’s right to say what she has said with her genuine, patient (for a while, at least) attempts to understand Micah’s concerns and the firestorm that she has evidently lit within the community. When she wakes to find a burning gorilla on a cross in her yard, Ms. McGloin’s reactions are visceral, human, and believable.”

MARCH 6, 2015 BY EDDIE REYNOLDS, THEATRE EDDYS 


Megan in The Water Children by Wendy MacLeod at Goodly Rotten Apple Productions

“Ms. McGloin does an affecting job as Megan.”

OCTOBER 7, 2012, BY ANITA GATES, NEW YORK TIMES

“Mary McGloin captures Megan’s warring feelings in her expressive features and body language.”

SEPTEMBER 29, 2012, BY DAVID SHEWARD, BACKSTAGE


Jean Muir in Diminished Fifth by Julie S. Halpern at Lovestreet Theatre

“Mary McGloin’s Jean Muir fully commits to the underlying despair of her alcoholism that prevents any potential loss of sympathy.”

JUNE 24, 2011 BY IVANA CULLINAN, NYTHEATRE.COM

Leonore in Family Dinner by Michele Willens at The Beckett Theatre, Theatre Row

“Mary McGloin is appropriately saucy in the role of Jane’s friend Leonore.”

JUNE 2010, BY BRYAN CLARK, SHOWBUSINESSWEEKLY.COM

Deeny in The Old Neighborhood by David Mamet at Custom Made Theatre Company

“The Old Neighborhood has it moments of being spellbinding…..the cast is first class….. Mary McGloin (lost girlfriend) convinces you that love is not all that you need.”

OCTOBER 5, 2007, BY BUZZIN’ LEE HARTGRAVE, BEYOND CHRON

Lucy in A Beautiful Home for the Incurable by Ian Walker at Second Wind Productions

“The ensemble includes …Mary McGloin as Lucy….They are all well cast, don’t miss a beat, and are delightful to watch.”

JULY 23, 2006, BY LINDA ARYES-FREDERICK, SF BAY TIMES

Lainie in Two Rooms by Lee Blessing at Custom Made Theatre Company

“Tensions play out beautifully in the understated portrayals by (Daveed) Diggs and (Mary) McGloin, both of whom depict intelligence and emotional maturity as Walker and Lanie make desperate decisions……Custom Made has produced a play that is simultaneously pertinent and worthwhile.”

FEBRUARY 6, 2006, BY EMILY FORBES, SF WEEKLY

Marie Curie in Pierre and Marie by Ron Clark at Bus Barn Theatre Company

“As Marie, Mary McGloin does a wonderful job…………She encapsulates the image of a slight, frail woman whose indomitable spirit and love of pure science represent a drive so strong that Pierre dropped his own research to join her, and follow her star.”

JUNE 3, 2004, BY KEITH KREITMAN, SAN MATEO COUNTY TIMES


Terry in Ladyhouse Blues by Kevin O’Morrison at City Lights Theatre Company

“Mary McGloin delivers a standout turn as Terry, the feistiest of the daughters, who campaigns for women’s rights. McGloin struts on stage with a head of steam massive enough to make us believe she’s gutsy enough to have been an activist in those days. When the homespun Liz tries to serve her daughter Helen (Valerie Weak) tea and whiskey to calm her consumption, McGloin as Terry visibly holds back her tongue. If she knows better than to treat tuberculosis with booze, she also knows better than to argue with her mother. Her fiery disposition and the dulcet musical interludes…. go a long way toward capturing the lyrical rhythms of this faraway time and place.”

JULY 20, 2000, BY KAREN D’SOUZA, SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS